Slow Cooked Lamb Stew

Slow cooked lamb stew is a melt-in-your-mouth masterpiece, with sweet carrots and starchy parsnips that simmer slowly in a bone broth-tomato medley, warming the body and soul on any wintery eve.

Slow Cooked Lamb Stew:

  • 1.5 lbs boneless ~OR~ 2 lbs bone-in lamb roast
  • Pinch of sea salt, plus additional for final seasoning
  • Freshly ground pepper, for seasoning
  • 1 large yellow onion, medium dice
  • 2 large carrots, chopped into thick rounds
  • 2 large parsnips, chopped into thick rounds
  • 4 cloves of garlic, sliced finely
  • 1/2 cup chicken or beef bone broth
  • 28-oz can of whole peeled tomatoes
  • 1/4 cup chopped parsley (added post-cooking)

Equipment:

  • Slow-cooker (such as a Crockpot)

Instructions:

Place the roast at the bottom of the crockpot. Sprinkle a pinch of salt and freshly cracked pepper over the exposed roast top. Add the onions, carrots, parsnips and garlic around and on top of the roast. Add the bone broth.

Pour the canned tomatoes and their juice over the top of the roast.

Place the lid on the crockpot and set on low, cooking for 7.5 hours. Using a fork and knife, break the lamb down into smaller pieces, and remove the bones at this time if using a bone-in roast. Cook on low for an additional 30 minutes.

Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Top with parsley and serve this slow cooked lamb stew hot.

Slow cooked lamb stew

Notes:

  • Best served with a side of crackling wood fire and cozy blanket, as well as my gluten-free multi-seed crackers.
  • Bone broth is my nourishing base-of-choice in this recipe because it’s easy to digest, helps to heal an inflamed gut, and has immune-boosting properties. Look for brands such as Kettle & Fire Bone Broth which use only organic ingredients (no emulsifiers or “natural” flavors), and include apple cider vinegar (which can help to draw out bone gelatin during the cooking process), enhancing the broth’s overall benefits and richness. While bone broth isn’t a rich-source of calcium, it offers collagen and minerals that are just as important for maintaining joint and bone health.

Disclaimer: Material presented on this website should not be considered medical advice. Always speak to your doctor or qualified health provider to determine what’s right for your health plan.

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